1920’s

Women’s Fashion


Women’s fashion makes a complete switch in the 1920s. Women are less restricted and decide to give up tight corsets and move into flare skirts and flowy dresses with straight and flat silhouettes. The Roaring 20’s was the opportunity of self expression and fun, clothes were often made at home which allowed creativity. Head dresses and hats were very popular in women’s fashion at this time and were made out of a large variety of different fabrics and accessories like feathers, velvet, lace, ribbons, etc. As seen in the image above they also had tight fitted hats called felt helmets.

Mens Fashion


Men’s fashion changed from being formal to baggy pants and even adding some patterns and cool socks to the outfit. The baggy ‘plus fours’ pants are wide legged trousers which were tightened at the end with high socks. This look was mostly worn by the youth while the elders stuck to the formal three piece suits.
Cars

The cars of 1920s color scheme was based on horse coaches but never before have cars been so colorful. Cars also started looking attractive as they manufactured cars with curves and lines.

Interior design

The idea was to be simple, neat and to save space when interior designing. The way they preserved space was through built-in furniture such as bookcases, desks, cases etc. Creating places to store objects was to reduce clutter and to keep small houses cosy and comfortable.

Celebrity: Coco Chanel


Coco Chanel was a fashion designer that revolutionized women’s clothing in the 1920s. She helped make women’s clothing more practical and simpler for every day use. Chanel introduced suits for women and other significant looks like a collarless cardigan jacket, wearing junk and jewels and the shoe string shoulder strap.

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